ingres copy

Copy of Ingres Portrait

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Seems to work well.

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Always trying to learn and experimenting with supplies and techniques, I painted this copy of the French 19th century master – Ingres.

The original Ingres on the left and my copy on the right.

 

I probably used a little too much oil in my copy as I was trying to get a “non brushstroke” look like he achieved. Of course, I now know that isn’t the way to achieve that effect. Also now, I don’t have any interest in that effect. So, that’s the way it goes.

I find it better when copying a master to learn, to try to have a goal in mind rather than just blindly trying to copy them for the sake of copying them. Try to learn how they did or achieved a particular thing. Such as a certain effect, how they used lines, how they balanced shapes against another, how they could make skin glow – are just a few that come to mind.

If you’d like check out my premium instruction, you can do so here

oil painting with arrows to teach dark to light painting

Should You Oil Paint Dark to Light or the Other Way Around?

Would you like to see a video about a great way to add color to your oil paintings? Watch this free video about a technique used by the old masters to add color to their paintings. One of the most basic principles of oil painting states to keep your darks thin and your light thick. Unfortunately, people try to follow this rule without knowing why and may get a pre-conceived "law" in their head that they are scared to break for fear they are not "painting right. Read More
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ingres copy

Copy of Ingres Portrait

Always trying to learn and experimenting with supplies and techniques, I painted this copy of the French 19th century master – Ingres.

The original Ingres on the left and my copy on the right.

 

I probably used a little too much oil in my copy as I was trying to get a “non brushstroke” look like he achieved. Of course, I now know that isn’t the way to achieve that effect. Also now, I don’t have any interest in that effect. So, that’s the way it goes.

I find it better when copying a master to learn, to try to have a goal in mind rather than just blindly trying to copy them for the sake of copying them. Try to learn how they did or achieved a particular thing. Such as a certain effect, how they used lines, how they balanced shapes against another, how they could make skin glow – are just a few that come to mind.

If you’d like check out my premium instruction, you can do so here

Completed oil painting sketch of starbucks coffee and johnson ave. in riverdale ny

Painting of a Street Scene – in stages

This is text that I added in with elementor. I want to see how this works so I could use posts and not pages for the content.

head in oil underpainting Here is a painting I did for a show I am having. I took photos of the work in different stages so you can see how the painting process works. One of the biggest mistakes I see aspiring painters make is thinking that you just draw it and then try to carefully fill it in. Almost in the way you would if you were coloring in a coloring book picture. Read More
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